Martha Stewart’s Cast-Iron Huckleberry Cobbler

Posted January 24, 2018 By sandy

Even Martha Steward appreciates the special tastes and uses for wild huckleberries.  She says it’s the cornmeal that makes this recipe special!!

See her wonderful recipe below:

Martha Stewart’s Cast-Iron Huckleberry Cobbler

Martha Stewart’s Cast-Iron Huckleberry Cobbler

Ingredients

  • 1 stick unsalted butter
  • 3 cups frozen huckleberries, thawed
  • 1 cup sugar, plus 2 tablespoons
  • 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped, or 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Melt butter in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet in oven, about 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, toss huckleberries with 2 tablespoons sugar in a medium bowl. Whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, salt, and remaining 1 cup sugar in a large bowl. Add milk and vanilla. Remove skillet from oven and add melted butter to flour mixture; whisk until just combined. Pour batter into skillet; top with huckleberries and juices.
  3. Bake until golden brown and fruit is bubbling, 40 to 45 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.
http://wildhuckleberry.com/2018/01/24/martha-stewarts-cast-iron-huckleberry-cobbler/

Original recipe published here

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Huckleberry Coffee Cake

Posted January 9, 2018 By sandy

Winter time, when the days are short and cold, seems the ideal time to take some of those fresh picked huckleberries out of the freezer and whip up this Huckleberry Coffee Cake.

Huckleberry Coffee Cake

Huckleberry Coffee Cake

Ingredients

  • 1⁄4 cup stick butter or margarine, softened
  • 8 ounce package fat free cream cheese (Author uses neufchatel)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups huckleberries (fresh or frozen, unthawed)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Beat margarine and cream cheese at medium speed with electric mixer until creamy; gradually 1 cup sugar, beating well. Add egg, and beat well.
  2. Combine flour, baking powder, and salt; stir into margarine mixture. Stir in vanilla, then fold in berries.
  3. Pour batter into a 9-inch round cake pan coated with cooking spray (I also lined bottom with parchment).
  4. Combine 2 tablespoons sugar and cinnamon; sprinkle over batter.
  5. Bake at 350F for 1 hour; cool on a wire rack.
http://wildhuckleberry.com/2018/01/09/huckleberry-coffee-cake/

Original recipe featured here

For those who do not have huckleberries still left in the freezer, our Tastes of Idaho website has some wonderfully huckleberry mixes:

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White Chocolate Huckleberry Cheesecake

Posted December 18, 2017 By sandy

Holidays are a wonderful time to make decadent desserts. 

If you are looking for a wonderful huckleberry dessert for your holiday get together, check out the following recipe from Wildflour’s Cottage Kitchen :

 

White Chocolate Huckleberry Cheesecake

White Chocolate Huckleberry Cheesecake

Ingredients

    For Huckleberry Fruit Filling:
  • 2 cups frozen huckleberries
  • ½ cup + 1 tablespoon sugar
  • ⅛ cup cornstarch mixed with ⅛ COLD water
  • ¼ tsp. almond extract
  • 1 Tablespoon. butter
  • 1 cup more frozen huckleberries
  • For Crust:
  • 1 sleeve + 7 Girl Scout Shortbread Cookies, finely ground, (or 1½ cups after grinding)
  • ½ cup finely ground almonds
  • 2½ Tablespoon. melted butter
  • For Cheesecake Batter:
  • 4 (8 oz.) packages. cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1½ cups sugar
  • 3 oz. Baker's White Baking Chocolate, melted and cooled but still pourable
  • Seeds of one vanilla bean, (can sub 1 tablespoon. vanilla extract)
  • ¾ cup heavy whipping cream
  • 4 extra large eggs
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • ⅓ cup white chocolate liqueur (Author uses Godiva)
  • 3 tablespoon. Amaretto Liqueur (Author uses Disaronno)
  • ¼ cup flour

Instructions

    For Huckleberry Fruit Filling:
  1. Place 2 cups of frozen berries and sugar into medium saucepan. Over medium heat, gently stir occasionally and cook until sugar has dissolved, there’s some juice, and mixture comes to a boil. Stir in cornstarch slurry, and continue cooking and gently stirring until very thick and clear. Remove from heat and stir in extract and butter until melted. Fold in last 1 cup frozen berries. Set aside to cool.
  2. For Almond Shortbread Cookie Crust:
  3. Place cookies and almonds in food processor. Process until fine crumbs. While running, stream in melted butter. Press evenly onto bottom and partially up sides of a sprayed 9" springform pan.
  4. For Cheesecake Batter:
  5. Preheat oven to 325º F.
  6. In large mixer bowl, beat cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Beat in vanilla bean seeds. Scrape sides, paddle and bottom and beat again.
  7. Starting on low speed, blend in melted and cooled white baking chocolate and heavy cream. (Turn up speed once it’s safe to not splatter.) Add eggs, one at a time, beating until just mixed. You don’t want to whip them and create air.
  8. Mix in sour cream, liqueurs, and flour until smooth. Scrape paddle, sides and bottom of bowl and mix again. Pour a little less than half of the batter into springform pan on top of crust.
  9. Sprinkle small dollops of fruit filling over the batter using a ½ cup.
  10. Pour more cheesecake batter evenly and gently over the fruit filling to within a ½" from the top of the springform pan.
  11. Evenly sprinkle another ½ cup of the filling over the top in small dollops again. With a knife or spoon, cut into fruit filling and swirl a little.
  12. Tear a large sheet of foil off, and set pan onto center. Press foil up sides of pan. Place into large roaster. (Big enough to hold pan level.)
  13. Open oven and place onto rack that puts cheesecake in the center of your oven. Fill roaster with boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the springform pan. Close door and bake for 1 hour and 45 minutes.
  14. When time is up, turn off oven, open door briefly (about 3 "Mississippi" seconds), close door and leave in oven for 1 hour.
  15. Remove from oven. Remove springform pan from roaster and foil, and place on a rack to cool. When cooled down, cover top of pan with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  16. The next day, run a knife around edge to loosen, and pop open springform ring. Remove ring and place cheesecake onto plate or serving stand.

Notes

If you have batter and fruit filling left over, just pour the batter into nice-sized, sprayed ramekins. Top with dollops of leftover fruit filling, swirl, and bake for about 45 minutes in 325º oven, or until edges are golden and the cakes no longer jiggle in the middle and are set. Crust and water bath not needed. It'll all get eaten and enjoyed

http://wildhuckleberry.com/2017/12/18/white-chocolate-huckleberry-cheesecake/

Check out the complete article

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Huckleberry Candy for the Holidays

Posted November 16, 2017 By sandy

Our sister website, Tastes of Idaho, features Idaho made products, including lots of huckleberry candy and goodies for personal enjoyment and gift giving.

Currently, we are fully stocked with our projected inventory of “made in Idaho” huckleberry candy for the holiday season. 

SIXTEEN different huckleberry candies, mostly combined with some form of chocolate, are now available on the Tastes of Idaho website

And, of course we do offer a wide variety of other “made in Idaho” candy selections.

But for right now, you will find THE largest candy inventory we will keep in stock all year at Tastes of Idaho, waiting for your order… while supplies last!

Our newest huckleberry candy additions include these four tongue-teasing wonders:

Huckleberry Candy for the Holidays

 

Huckleberry Cordial Nuggets — Farr’s supersized cordial is a twist on the old-fashioned cordials, sure to satisfy any huckleberry chocolate craving! 

Huckleberry Gummi Bears — A fun new treat at Tastes of Idaho, especially popular with youngsters, and those of us who refuse to grow up!

Huckleberry Jelly Beans — Back in stock due to customer demand, after being unavailable for a few years!

Idaho Huckleberry Dark Chocolate Bar — Large huckleberry fondant-filled DARK chocolate bar (we continue to offer the same bar in milk chocolate!).

Check out the entire selection of old favorites and new sweet treats at the links below:

Huckleberry Candy
All Candy and Confections

PS  By the end of this week, we will be at maximum inventory. Shop and send (or order with delayed shipment) when selections are the greatest. And don’t forget our famous “build your own custom gift baskets” with free shrink-wrapping and personalized gift note card… a service we are quite famous for!

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Huckleberry Marmalade

Posted October 11, 2017 By sandy

I am always on the lookout for unique huckleberry recipes. 

Huckleberry marmalade is a bit unique just by itself, but this particular recipe uses Calamondin — which is a hybrid between the mandarin orange and the kumquat. 

I would imagine you can use oranges, but why not try calamondins??

Huckleberry Marmalade

Yield: Recipe makes 7 to 8 -- 8-ounce jars.

Huckleberry Marmalade

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 pounds huckleberries
  • 1 1/2 pounds calamondin, sliced into thin rounds and seeds discarded
  • 2 pounds cane sugar
  • 5 1/2 ounces lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Place a couple of spoons in the freezer to use to test the marmalades doneness.
  2. Add all the ingredients to a large non-reactive pot, and stir over medium low heat until well mixed and it starts to get a bit juicy. Gradually raise the heat to high, and continue to stir as the mixture comes to a rapid boil. If the mixture starts to stick to the bottom of the pot, turn down the heat a little, but keep it at a good boil.
  3. Cook the mixture for about 15 minutes. The mixture will foam, and then start to darken.
  4. Start to test the mixture for doneness at this point, but taking a small spoonful with the frozen spoons. Return the full spoon to the freezer, and let it sit for a few minutes. Tilt the chilled mixture to see how it runs. If it runs quickly, then continue to cook the marmalade. If it runs slowly, your marmalade is ready.
  5. Test every 5 minutes until it is done. Give the mixture a gentle stir to distribute the fruit evenly, and then place in sterile jamming jars and process as directed by the manufacturer pr just store in the fridge.
http://wildhuckleberry.com/2017/10/11/huckleberry-marmalade/

Read complete story about this recipe

Sounds like a good topping for cheesecake, ice cream …. or just on toast!!

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Huckleberry Streusel Bars

Posted September 20, 2017 By sandy

Huckleberries are fun to pick and fun to eat — just plain or in some of the numerous recipes posted on our site. 

But have you ever tried huckleberry streusel bars?

Check out the recipe from My Kitchen in the Rockies:

Huckleberry Streusel Bars

Huckleberry Streusel Bars

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup (155 g) organic brown sugar
  • 1½ cup (150 g) old fashioned oats
  • 1½ cup (180 g) organic flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup (170 g) cold unsalted organic butter, cut into very small pieces
  • 1 cup (290 g) Huckleberry jam

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 F, I use Convection. Grease a 9x13" baking pan with butter or cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. In a bigger bowl mix all the dry ingredients (except the butter) very well.
  3. Add the butter and mix it in with your fingers until the dough gets crumbly and all the butter is worked in very nicely.
  4. Set ⅔ cup of streusel mixture aside.
  5. Press the remaining mixture evenly into the prepared baking pan.
  6. Spread the jam evenly on top.
  7. Sprinkle the reserved streusel evenly over the jam.
  8. Bake for about 40 minutes (mine was done in 37 minutes).
  9. Let cool in the pan for about 30 minutes.
  10. Cut baked good into bars.
  11. Store in air tight container.

Notes

You can use any jam of your liking. I would recommend raspberry as well. 2. The bars freeze well. 3. Makes for a great lunch box snack.

http://wildhuckleberry.com/2017/09/20/huckleberry-streusel-bars/

Enjoy!

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Huckleberry Picking in the Cascades

Posted September 13, 2017 By sandy

Huckleberry season in the Rocky Mountain region is most over for this year, but some folks are still picking in the Cascades in Oregon.

I ran across this delightful picking story that I want to share with you by John Rezell, Editor, OutdoorsNW :

Huckleberry Picking in the Cascades

Recipe for Huckleberry Bliss

We’ve ventured high into the Cascades in search of August’s bounty of huckleberries, but early signs along the trail are spotty at best. Someone or something appears to have cleaned up….

About three miles up the trail the picking pace begins to accelerate as single dark purple huckleberries pop into view. At first it’s a lone berry or two that appear ripe on a bush. Then, suddenly, a whole bush explodes with ripe berries lighting up against the green leaves like fireworks….

I can’t describe the fulfillment that comes with plucking tiny berries from a bush, nor the eruption of taste buds that follows the burst of small pea-sized berry crunched between my teeth….

When we move to the next section I’m amazed at how quickly my brain zeroes in on huckleberries as our primary target. A single berry against the forest’s sea of green appears to pop out as if a lone spotlight casts upon it in a dark theater.

The rest of the forest blends into an idyllic background. I can almost hear a choir strike a heavenly chord on cue. Ahhhhh!!!…

READ THE FULL STORY

 

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Huckleberry Honey Mojitos

Posted August 31, 2017 By sandy

I find it fascinating to find all the different ways people use huckleberries and huckleberry products in their personal recipes.

The following recipe is a new twist on the traditional Mojitos …. but before we take a look at the recipe, if you need huckleberry honey (which is one of the ingredients used in this drink), we carry a full supply on the following website:  Tastes of Idaho!

 

Huckleberry Honey Mojitos

Huckleberry Honey Mojitos

Ingredients

  • 2 oz white rum
  • 3/4 oz huckleberry honey
  • 5 garden fresh mint leaves
  • 2 oz soda water
  • Lime wedges

Instructions

  1. In a glass with ice, combine all ingredients, stir together.
  2. Garnish with lime wedges and mint.

Notes

Tip: Omit alcohol and swap out for soda water to make a mocktail

http://wildhuckleberry.com/2017/08/31/huckleberry-honey-mojitos/

Check out the full article!

 

 

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Huckleberry Cream Pie Recipe

Posted August 25, 2017 By sandy

If you love huckleberry pie, we have loads of huckleberry pie recipes on this site.

But, if you are like me and want an easy way to make huckleberry pie, we have just the product for you:  Huckleberry Pie Filling.

Two jars of this delicious huckleberry pie filling will fill a 9 inch pie shell.  

Or if you are looking for a tasty, easy way to make Huckleberry Cream Pie —  we have it here!!  And I, personally, have made it several times and it has always been a hit.

HUCKLEBERRY CREAM PIE

Ingredients

  • 1 large package Instant Vanilla Pudding
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 small container of cool whip
  • 1 16 oz. jar of huckleberry (or blackcap) pie filling

Instructions

  1. Combine the first four ingredients above (not the pie filling).
  2. Once they are mixed well, fold in the pie filling.
  3. Spoon into a crust of your choice.
  4. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
  5. Refrigerate any leftovers – if there are any!!

And we have either Huckleberry or Blackcap Pie Filling available at Tastes of Idaho to make this creamy pie!

Surprise your friends and family with this luscious cream pie.

(By the way, the recipe is on the jar of pie filling!)

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Native Americans and Huckleberries

Posted August 22, 2017 By sandy

Native Americans enjoy a long history of picking and maintaining many huckleberry stands throughout the northwest region.

The use and preservation of huckleberries is recorded as far back at 1615 when explorer Samuel de Champlain observed Native Americans collecting and drying huckleberries for winter use.  Even the first huckleberry rakes were developed by Native Americans!  (For more history about huckleberries in the Pacific Northwest, you might want to check out the USDA booklet: : A Social History of Wild Huckleberry Harvesting in the Pacific Northwest, also listed on our resource page.)

The tradition continues and is shared in the following article by Eilís O’Neill:

Tribe’s Huckleberry Harvest Brings Fire (or Something Like It) Back to the Forest

… Traditionally, the Tulalip (tribe) ate huckleberries — at home and in ceremonies — brewed tea from the leaves, and used the juice to dye their clothes. Huckleberries were abundant thanks to forest fires, which opened up wetlands and meadows and made space for short, shrubby plants that need the sun—plants like huckleberry bushes.

But, for decades the Forest Service has tried to put out fires as fast as possible, so there isn’t much huckleberry habitat left. That’s why the Tulalip Tribe is working with the Forest Service to recreate open patches in the forest…

Today’s brush-clearing is part of an agreement between the Forest Service and the Tulalip Tribe signed five years ago. The agreement is based on the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott, which reserves the Tulalip’s right to hunt and gather in unclaimed lands.

“The tribes see their treaty right as more than just the ability to gather,” says Libby Nelson, who helped negotiate the agreement. The tribe’s members also, she says, “want to be part of the stewardship as they had been for thousands of years.”

The agreement allows the tribe to keep some clear-cut Forest Service land open for huckleberry habitat.

“Logging is kind of doing what prescribed burns and traditional burning used to do to keep certain areas open and from having the conifers overtake these earlier forest stages and meadows,” she explains.

Controlled burns are still on the table for the future — but for now, the tribe is focusing on clearing the land with chainsaws—and teenagers…

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

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