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New Facebook Group for Huckleberry Lovers!

Posted August 6, 2015 By sandy

We have just published a huckleberry group where you can share your stories, pictures and recipes for huckleberries:

Huckleberry Hunting and Recipes

Huckleberry Hunting & Recipes

Join our Huckleberry Facebook Group today and get in on the fun!

NOTE:  Our “I Love Wild Huckleberries! Picking, Growing, and Cooking” is also active if you would like to like it as well!

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Huckleberry Muffins

Posted August 3, 2015 By sandy

If you went picking already, and haven’t eaten all your huckleberries yet, let me share a recipe for Huckleberry Muffins!

If you have never had huckleberries, they are similar to blueberries in texture, but the taste is a bit different. Pop a handful of these little berries in your mouth and you are hit with a burst of tart flavor, followed by a sweetness unlike any other. Just a perfect combination for some yummy muffins.

Huckleberry Muffins

Huckleberry Muffins

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ cup milk
  • ⅓ cup oil
  • 1 to ½ cups of huckleberries

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  2. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl and stir with wooden spoon.
  3. Add wet ingredients and stir until well combined.
  4. Gently fold in huckleberries
  5. Pour batter into muffin pan, filling each section ¾ full.
  6. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes

Notes

If you want to add a crumble top, mix together ⅓ cup of flour, ⅓ cup brown sugar and ¼ cup melted butter. Sprinkle on top of muffins before baking.

http://wildhuckleberry.com/2015/08/03/huckleberry-muffins-3/

Recipe was found on Spoonie Foodie blog.  Check out the full article for the cute story about The First Batch of Huckleberry Muffins!

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Huckleberries and Bumblebees

Posted July 9, 2015 By sandy

Did you know that bumblebees are the prime pollinators for huckleberries?  Not the honey bees!

Huckleberries and bumblebees … I sure did not know that!

According to a Outdoor blog posted on the Spokesman Review …..

Bumblebee may be huckleberry pickers’ best friend

Huckleberries and Bumblebees

Sure, honeybees get the glory and we get their honey,but wild bees (about 150 different species probably occupy northeastern Washington), including bumble bees, pollinate far more crops, including many of those in our gardens, than the honeybee,” says Chris Loggers, wildlife biologist with the Colville National Forest.

“For example, honeybees rarely pollinate that wonderful fruit that most of us pick each year — huckleberries. It appears that bumblebees might be one of huckleberries’ prime pollinators.”

Lets continue to ‘be nice’ to our friends the bumblebees!

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Huckleberry Bundt Cake with Meringue Frosting

Posted January 7, 2015 By sandy

I hope you had a wonderful huckleberry holiday season!

Personally, we sent huckleberry products and gift baskets from our Tastes of Idaho site to over 27 states — and even one basket to Ireland!!

By the way, we are currently running a After the Holiday sale on the site.  Check it out here to receive 35% off your order!!

In the meantime, check out the following Huckleberry Bundt Cake recipe from the Seattle Flour Child website:

Huckleberry Bundt Cake with Meringue Frosting

Huckleberry Bundt Cake with Meringue  Frosting

Ingredients

  • CAKE
  • 3 C All Purpose Flour
  • 1 T baking powder
  • 1 t salt
  • 1 – 2/3 C sugar
  • 3/4 C unsalted butter – at room temp
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 T orange zest
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/2 tsp almond extract
  • 3/4 C buttermilk
  • 2 C frozen huckleberries (it’s important they are frozen, or they will bleed all over the cake)
  • MERINGUE FROSTING
  • 1 C sugar
  • 1/3 C water, minus 1 T
  • 1 T orange juice
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 pinch cream of tartar
  • 1/2 t vanilla

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350. Use shortening and flour to ready your bundt pan or spray generously. Sift together flour, baking powder and salt. In the bowl of a standing mixer, beat butter and sugar together until light. Add eggs one at a time, and then add orange zest, vanilla and almond. Mix thoroughly and add dry ingredients alternately with buttermilk. Fold in berries, pour into pan and bake ~50 minutes until top springs back easily. Cool at least 8 – 10 minutes and then turn out onto a plate or rack.
  2. FROSTING: Begin heating sugar and water /juice in a small saucepan. Add a candy thermometer to the pan. Continue to boil as you froth two egg whites in the base of a standing mixer. Add cream of tartar when egg whites are frothy, stop beating. When sugar reaches about 225 degrees, begin whipping the egg whites on high until peaks form. When sugar mixture reaches 240 or soft ball stage, remove from heat and pour in a steady stream into whites, with mixer running on low. Beat for 7 full minutes until fluffy and glossy – and add half teaspoon vanilla.
http://wildhuckleberry.com/2015/01/07/huckleberry-bundt-cake-with-meringue-frosting/

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Want Huckleberry Products?

Posted November 13, 2014 By sandy

Just wanted to post a note about our annual 10% off pre-Christmas sale on Tastes of Idaho website — running November 16 to November 19, Sunday through Wednesday.

Huckleberry products

If you are looking for special huckleberry gifts for your friends and/or family,  this is the place to see the one of the largest online selection of  huckleberry products.

Note that we are happy to DELAY shipments to your friends and family … just be sure to make a note in the comments upon completion of your order. Otherwise, we usually send in 1 to 3 business days, depending on sales volume.

Tastes of Idaho

Remember:  Sales starts this Sunday and runs until Wednesday!

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Huckleberry Crepes with Ricotta Cheese

Posted October 15, 2014 By sandy

One of my favorite huckleberry recipe book is Huckleberry Delights:  A Collection of Huckleberry Recipes by Karen Jean Matsko Hood.

Karen has numerous recipes in her book, and here is one that I thought you would enjoy:  Huckleberry Crepes

Huckleberry Crepes

Huckleberry Crepes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 6 large eggs
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 3 cups milk
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese
  • 2 cups huckleberry (preferably fresh, but frozen will work)
  • confectioner's sugar

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl mix flour, eggs, salt and milk until smooth
  2. Heat an 8 inch crepe pan and brush with butter or oil
  3. Pour about 1/4 cups batter into the pan
  4. Tip and cover entire pan with batter
  5. Crepe is ready to turn when the bottom side begins to brown
  6. Slip cooked crepes onto warm plate and keep warm while remaining better is used
  7. When ready to serve, spread 2 tablespoons ricotta cheese down the middle of the crepe and place huckleberries on top
  8. Roll crepe together and sprinkle with confectioner's sugar
  9. Garnish with more huckleberries, if desired
  10. Serve plain or with syrup
http://wildhuckleberry.com/2014/10/15/huckleberry-crepes/

If you are interested in more of Karen’s huckleberry recipes, HB Delights Cookbook
check out her 309 page book.  Along with over 250 recipes, she also includes sections on …

  • Huckleberry Botanical Classification
  • Huckleberry Cultivations and Gardening
  • Huckleberry Facts
  • Huckleberry Folklore
  • Huckleberry History
  • Huckleberry Nutrition and Health
  • Huckleberry Poetry
  • Huckleberry Types
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2014 Huckleberry Season Looking Good!

Posted July 24, 2014 By sandy

We have heard from many pickers around the Rocky Mountain region that this years huckleberry crop is as good — or maybe even better — than the 2009 season.  Rainfall and spring temps were ideal for growing a bumper crop of juicy huckleberries.

Huckleberry Season

The Spokesman Review has picked up on the excitement in their recent article:

Landers: Huckleberry season has pickers bursting with excitement

…The huckleberry season is underway at lower elevations and the pleasure is working its way up the region’s mountainsides as the berries ripen….

…The picking season generally starts in this region in the first or second week of July at elevations around 2,400 feet, such as the stretch of lowland between Priest River and Priest Lake. Snow cover is needed to insulate the plants to survive during the winter, so huckleberries are rarely found at lower elevations.

The berries are ripening at higher elevations this week, but the peak range of ripe berries occurs in August….

…“Last week I was in the woods with some friends and we found many ripe huckleberries and many more that were not yet ripe,” said Phil Cooper, Idaho Fish and Game conservation educator in Coeur d’Alene.  “Most plants were very heavy with berries, so it should be a banner year for picking.”…

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Yes, it sounds like a good year to go huckleberry picking!

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Huckleberry Season is in Full Swing

Posted July 23, 2013 By sandy

An update on the huckleberry crop via the Spokane Review:

Huckleberry Patch

Picture taken by “Mr. Huckleberry” on his trip to north Idaho for huckleberries!!

Harvest underway for huckleberries — Idaho’s state fruit

FORESTS – Huckleberries, designated Idaho’s state fruit in 2000, have been ripe for picking for a couple weeks in the low areas of Priest Lake, and the crop is gradually ripening up the mountain slopes throughout the Inland Northwest.

Don’t set your purple-tongue ambitions too high, yet.

Outdoors editor Rich Landers found ripe huckleberries for the first hour of hiking up Scotchman Peak Trail 65 northeast of Lake Pend Oreille on Thursday with lots of green berries above that to satisfy berry pickers in the prime picking period of August.

Savvy huckleberry pluckers know certain high areas, such as the Roman Nose Peak region in the Selkirks, are harvest-perfect in September.

Huckleberries flourish in several varieties across the region, from the deep-purple lowbush types in the east Cascades and Pasayten Wilderness to the tiny grouse huckleberry (a.k.a. grouse whortleberry) that grows on 10-inch high, small-leaf plants at or above timberline in the Selkirks and Bitterroots.

The ”big huckleberry” (a.k.a. black or thin-leaved) is the most popular berry in the Idaho Panhandle. This species grows in moist, cool forested environments at mid to upper elevations. The plants grow up to three feet tall and take up to 15 years to reach full maturity.  The single, dark purple berries grow on the shoots the plant produced that year, according to plant ecologist Charles Johnson….

Bears can be expected anywhere berries are ripe. Pickers should carry bear spray as a precaution.

READ FULL STORY

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Huckleberry Snack Mix

Posted July 3, 2013 By sandy

Nothing beats huckleberry chocolates, but during the hot summers …. well, chocolate is just not a good thing to pack or take on a trip!

But for those who love trail mix, Wildbeary has developed a Huckleberry Snack Mix.

Wildbeary Huckleberry Snack MixLike a trail mix, Huckleberry Snack Mix includes some healthy and wonderfully tasty ingredients:

  • Roasted and salted almonds
  • Organic soy nuts
  • Chocolate covered sunflower seeds
  • Sesame sticks
  • Craisins
  • Sugar Infused Huckleberries

In case you are not familiar with sugar-infused huckleberries, they are fresh picked huckleberries, soaked in a sugar solution and dried slightly to resemble a huckleberry ‘raisin’ — the closest thing to a fresh shelf stable huckleberry.

And if you are concerned with the chocolate covered sunflower seeds, they can withstand a great deal of heat before they melt.

All in all, this product is perfect for summer day snacks.

Where can you order these?  Just check out our Tastes of Idaho site for Wildbeary Huckleberry Snack Mix.  

While you are there, check out some of our other huckleberry goodies!

Also as you know, huckleberry season is just around the corner.  If you have not already ordered your huckleberry picking rake, make sure to check them out as well — we have several in stock right now, but they sell out fast this time of the year!!

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Huckleberry Festival in Jay, Oklahoma

Posted June 26, 2013 By sandy

Honestly, I never understood a Huckleberry Festival in Jay, Oklahoma!!  I even emailed them one year to inquire, but never got a response!

But if you live in the area and love huckleberries, this looks like a good one to attend!

Jay celebrates 46th Annual Huckleberry Festival

JAY – The 46th Annual Huckleberry Festival in Jay will kick off on Wednesday when the Carnival comes to JB Earp Stadium.

Many events are planned for this year all centering around the star of the show – “huckleberries”.

Some of the events include:

  • The carnival — Wednesday through Saturday
  • Fireworks on July 4.
  • Huckleberry Pie Contest
  • Huckleberry Arts & Craft Show

Check out the complete list of event

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