Tips on Growing Huckleberries

The Wild Huckleberry Association’s favorite resource on growing huckleberries is Dr. Dan Barney’s Book:  Growing Western Huckleberries (link to book or pdf file is listed near the bottom of our Resource Page.)

Once in awhile, we run across a article with some excellent tips on growing huckleberries.  One such article, by Amy Grant, is from the Gardening Know How website:

Tips on Growing Huckleberries

Here are excerpts from her article:

Huckleberry Plant Care – Tips For Planting Huckleberries

… Keep in mind that the species requires moist, acidic soil anywhere from a pH range of 4.3 to 5.2 when planting your huckleberries. Also when planting huckleberries, they may be situated in either sun or shade, although you will get a better yield and larger, lusher plants in shaded areas.
 
Between April and May, expect the western huckleberry to flower, provided you live in USDA zones 7-9 where the specimen is recommended for planting. It is often found in mid-alpine regions and will thrive if you have similar conditions. Propagation can be from transplanting, rhizome cuttings or seeding.
 
Transplanting wild bushes is difficult due to their lack of centralized root systems, although this may be attempted in late fall to early winter. Grow the huckleberries in a pot for one to two years in a peat moss based soil before transplanting to the garden.
 

You may also start growing huckleberries via rhizome, not stem, cutting. Collect the rhizome cuttings in late winter or early spring, in 4-inch long sections buried in sand-filled nursery flats. Do not dip in rooting compound. Keep flats misted or covered with clear film to retain moisture. Once the cuttings have 1 – to 2-inch long roots and shoots, transplant into 1-gallon pots with peat moss based soil.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Huckleberry Plant Care – Tips For Planting Huckleberries

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