Northwest Wild Food on Huckleberries

Our friends at Northwest Wild Foods posted a fun fact post earlier in the month.  Here are some of the highlights:

The wild mountain blue huckleberry, or Vaccinium ovalifolium, is a true treasure of the Great Pacific Northwest. The stunning little blue berries are fit to be the crowning glory of any of Mother Natures golden tiaras. Not only are huckleberries a treat for the eyes, but when raw they have a delicious sweet- tart taste that will leave you wanting more. When cooked into syrups or baked into pies, they have a tantalizingly pure and rich flavor all their own that has been a popular staple among countless American families for generations…

What are huckleberries? Northwest Wild Food on Huckleberries

The wild mountain blue huckleberry is a perennial evergreen shrub that usually ranges from 2-3 ft tall but can reach as high as 10. It has 1/2 to 1 1/2 inch serrated leaves that start out red-bronze but turn bright green in the Summer months….

Where do huckleberries grow?

The wild mountain blue huckleberries grow in acidic mountain soils at elevations from 2,000 to 11,000 ft. They can be found all the way from Alaska to Washington and Oregon, to Idaho, Montana and Wyoming….

Health Benefits:

  • Huckleberries are associated with lowering cholesterol; protecting against heart diseases, muscular degeneration, glaucoma, varicose veins, and peptic ulcers.
  • High in vitamin C, Huckleberries protect the body against immune deficiencies, cardiovascular diseases, prenatal health problems, and eye diseases.
  • An excellent source of vitamin A and B, huckleberries are great for promoting a healthy metabolism which in turn helps reduce the risk of stroke. They are also known to help stave off macular degeneration as well as viruses and bacteria.
  • Huckleberries are an excellent source of iron which helps build new red blood cells and helps fatigue associated with iron deficiency.
  • The huckleberry ensures proper functioning of nerve and muscle tissues, such as the heart and skeletal muscles, due to its high content of potassium. It also helps regulate water balance and eliminate waste.

As a special treat, NW Wild Foods shares a wonderful huckleberry pie recipe.

Check it out on their website:

WILD MOUNTAIN BLUE HUCKLEBERRIES

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One Comment

  1. Comment by sandy:

    We received the following comment from Joyce LeCompte at the University of Washington concerning this post:

    “Not sure what species nwwf is actually describing here. The photos are of v. membranaceum. Ovalifolium is not evergreen, and has smooth margins, not serrated. What they describe in text sounds a lot like v. ovatum, evergreen huckleberry, which is abundant in the lowland coastal areas, and really productive on the coast. ”

    Thanks Joyce for your input!

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